Organization company – Ron Bercume http://ronbercume.com/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 06:51:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ronbercume.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png Organization company – Ron Bercume http://ronbercume.com/ 32 32 Payday loans are available in Texas: Get the best rates with GreendayOnline https://ronbercume.com/payday-loans-are-available-in-texas-get-the-best-rates-with-greendayonline/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 06:51:48 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/?p=359 Where can I find a payday loan in Texas? There are a variety of options to obtain a loan for Texas residents. If, for instance, you are a traditionalist then you could search for payday loan businesses in Texas for yourself. You can find credit unions as well as money lenders across every part of Texas which […]]]>

Where can I find a payday loan in Texas?

There are a variety of options to obtain a loan for Texas residents. If, for instance, you are a traditionalist then you could search for payday loan businesses in Texas for yourself. You can find credit unions as well as money lenders across every part of Texas which means it shouldn’t be a challenge to locate one. However, if you’re seeking the best location in Texas to find the top rates for all types of loans, GreendayOnline can help. With cutting-edge apps and strong partnership with fintech firms We are a supplier of top-quality online loans.

At GreendayOnline you can find the best lenders all in one spot. Have access to all the top lenders around Austin, Texas, who have the best loan conditions that are suitable for your needs. Also, enjoy an endless selection of loan types to choose from; enjoy the choice of either payday as well as installment loans, with no service charges.

The best benefits and features of GreendayOnline

We’ll help you find the Lowest Rates

Get the best deals on loans in your fingertips on one device using GreendayOnline. We’ll find the top loan deals that meet your requirements using smart technology that can filter offers according to your needs. You can get cash advances of $100-$5,000 at the lowest rates you can get.

We can assist you 24 Hours and 7 days a week.

If you’ve ever had the experience of borrowing elsewhere previously, you’ll know the annoyances it brings. Hours of operation, weekends and holidays can make borrowing difficult. If you’re in need of money quickly every minute you are waiting could be a disaster. However, with GreendayOnline timing isn’t an issue. We can assist you at every time of week, and any moment during the week. We are available to you and provide support for customers all hours of the day. In this way, we’ll be able to take care of your loan immediately and provide you with the cash you require immediately.

Only works with trusted lenders

Secure yourself and your privacy from loan sharks and scammers at GreendayOnline. We’ve scrutinized and verified each lender we work with to make sure they are genuine and reliable.

It’s Fast and Has Guaranteed Top Performance

We won’t give you a lower rate. We work every day to find you the most reliable payday lender that we can find within our network that can offer you the most competitive deal on loans. We handle all requests in a rapid manner without making you wait as with traditional banks. Instant decisions on any type of loan provided you adhere to our lending requirements.

Accept All Types of Credit Histories

At GreendayOnline All credit types are accepted. We will approve cash advances within Texas of all types. We even offer loans for our customers with poor credit. Therefore, whatever you’re looking for and where you are in life your future is bright with us at GreendayOnline.

What do I need to know before I apply for a payday loan in Texas?

To be eligible for a payday loan within Texas, the State of Texas you must be at minimum 18 years old, and a resident in Texas with a steady sources of revenue.

To prepare your documents as well as other data you will require, you must prepare the following documents:

  1. A document that proves your identity like an ID issued by the US Government.
  2. A document that proves your address like an actual tax receipt or a utility bill that bears your name.
  3. A document that proves your earnings, such as a pay stub, or a Social Benefits check.
  4. A document that proves your bank account, such as a bank statement or certificate of deposit issued by your institution.
  5. Your contact information, such as your telephone number and email address.

To speed up the process of the application you must prepare yourself and your documents prior to applying. To ensure you’re prepared to apply for a payday loan now learn what you need to know prior to applying for payday loans.

How do I apply for a payday loan in Texas?

Once you’ve got your loan requirements in order and you’re ready to apply for a GreendayOnline loan. Follow the instructions as follows:

  1. Select the amountyou are looking to take out.
  2. Choose your due dateyou are due to pay your lender.
  3. Enter your basic personal details.
  4. Send your request for loan to be approved.

When you submit your online application You will be notified within a couple of hours. If you submit your request early enough you could even receive an instant approval in 1 hours or so.

What is the fastest way to get a Texas Payday Loans?

In times of crisis the best thing to do is we provide the money for your financial needs quickly. To speed up the process, please follow the online steps to fill out our form and ensure that we are able to contact you via phone or email to get more details.

Loans for payday in Texas through GreendayOnline can be as quick as the same day withdrawal. We’ve designed our quick cash loans, and our installment loans to be swift. We ensure that each of our loans are quick and easy to meet your cash needs by the next working day in the best case.

In just one hour you will receive an instant decision and then review the top loan offers through one of our partner. Then, upon you have completedsigning the contract, make sure you make sure that your money is in your bank account to withdraw within the next day.

What are the repayment methods for Payday Loans in Texas?

Paying off your loan has been simpler through GreendayOnline. Instead of driving to the market on your own to pay for your loan using automatic debit. Your lender will get payment via your bank account at the due date you’ve set with your bank.

You may choose to repay your loan at once , on one day. The most practical choice for small-dollar loans such as payday loans.

You may also opt to spread your payments across months too. This is a great option for bigger loan amounts, like with an installment loan.

Can I get a payday loan with bad credit in Texas?

Yes, you can. Because your credit score is not the sole determinant of your chance for success with GreendayOnline bad credit isn’t the end. Contrary to traditional lending institutions like credit unions and banks having a poor credit score is not a reason to disqualify you from being eligible.

With our extensive lending pool we can find all kinds of loans that are suitable for all credit types and a variety of ways to use them for our clients. We also have advanced technology that improve your chances of approval in a matter of minutes by matching you with the most promising lender. Even if you have a low credit score, we’ll assist you in finding ways to get credit. We will be able to take advantage of your current income source and make use of it to get payday loans in Texas with poor credit.

Please send us your application. We’ll do our best to get you the money you need at the lowest price possible.

Can I get a loan in Texas Without a Credit Check?

You might be used to having your credit checked each when you attempt to inquire or make an application for loans. You might be aware of how credit checks are reflected in your credit score even when you do not apply for the loan. They are referred to as hard credit checks and they can harm your credit history and score.

However, here at GreendayOnline we don’t need hard credit checks to submit the loan you are applying for. If you have a history of using our services then we don’t have to do any checks in any way. However, even if you’re first time borrowing from us, we conduct only gentle credit check. Soft credit checks will not affect your credit score, therefore they shouldn’t worry you.

Frequently asked questions

1. Is GreendayOnline a lender?

We are not an direct lender. Our company is a broker who provides high-end connection services to top-quality loan firms in Texas. We’re more than just an intermediary between payday stores and the borrowers. Our aim is to ensure both borrowers and lenders are protected throughout every lending transaction.

2. Why is it important to Select a licensed lender in Texas?

Lending money to unlicensed lenders is risky. Unlicensed means that they’re not regulated and registered by any financial agency. They could charge excessive fees and rates. They could even steal your identity using the documents you provide for fraud.

To avoid risky lenders, it is possible to review reviews or seek out referrals to avoid them, however this process can take time and could be time-consuming. To cut down on time our team at GreendayOnline can help you in separating good lenders from bad.

3. What happens if I’m Not Able to Pay Back My Loan?

If you are unable to repay your loan, you’ll be responsible to the lender. At GreendayOnline we don’t submit our information to any credit bureau and therefore do not cause negative impact to your credit score.

However, the situation will be different if the lender decides to make use of debt collection agencies. The debt collection company can inform you of their intention to press you to pay back your loan as fast as it is feasible. They may even file suit against you and take you before a judge, typically in the last alternative.

4. What is the maximum amount I can borrow with A Texas Cash Advance?

You can take out anywhere from 100 to $5,000 with our payday loans available at GreendayOnline. You can decide how much you want to borrow at the start of the application procedure. We then search our database to find the lender that offers the most favorable rate in response to your requirements.

5. Does GreendayOnline Charge Fees to Apply?

Our premium connectivity services are offered absolutely free for all of our customers. The rates and charges stated in the loan contract are for the lender only. Therefore, you are able to easily ask for and apply for a GreendayOnline loan. If you receive an offer you can choose to choose to accept or decline it at your discretion and without any penalties.

6. What is the maximum amount I can borrow the Payday Loan?

A short-term loan is one that it is typical to get payday loans for up to four weeks. However, the setup may be flexible. If you’re looking for a loan with a longer term, like installment loans, the hold time can be extended. Some lenders will allow you to take out loans at least 60 months, with the possibility of allowing to extend the loan if need be.

7. What happens if I alter my Decision and I Decide to Refund my payday loan in Texas?

We are trying to find the best deal that will meet your needs, we could fail to deliver. If you don’t like your deal, you may decide not to submit your application.

As long as you’ve not signed a contract as of yet you don’t have to worry about it. However, if you’ve entered into an agreement, get in touch with your lender about the best way to end the application.

8. What are some alternatives to payday loans?

You may apply for the title loan or auto-title loans. There are cash advances with credit cards and bad credit loans. fast money loans, no credit loans, and numerous other payday loan options you can investigate.

Title loans, for example, when you own a home or car, you may utilize it as collateral for an even larger amount of money. After you have paid back your lender, you receive your title.

There are also apps for payday which provide instant cash loans when you require cash faster, however you’re only able to request smaller loan amounts from payday apps.

9. Do You Provide Installment Loans through GreendayOnline?

Yes, we provide installment loans here at GreendayOnline. Make an inquiry for the amount you would like to borrow and the zip code you’re using to begin. According to the lender you have chosen you may be able to get installment loans above $5,000, which you can pay off for between 12 and 60 months.

10. What are the average rates and terms of Payday loans within Texas through GreendayOnline?

The terms of the loan can differ based upon the lending institution, however we offer rates that which you can use to determine the most affordable payday loans. For the majority of payday loans available in Texas the general most common rule of thumb is that you’ll have to pay anywhere from $10 to $30 for each $100 that you are able to borrow. For APR, which is the annual percentage rate taking $100 to pay a $15 cost is equivalent to a 400 percent APR.

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Congress Prepares To Invalidate OCC’s True Lender Rule – Consumer Protection https://ronbercume.com/congress-prepares-to-invalidate-occs-true-lender-rule-consumer-protection/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 10:32:30 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/?p=171 On Thursday (March 26, 2021), Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) introduced a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution of disapproval to invalidate the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency’s (OCC) true lender rule. The resolution is co-sponsored by Senate Banking Committee Chair Sherrod Brown (D-OH) and Senators Jack Reed (D-RI), Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Catherine Cortez-Masto […]]]>

On Thursday (March 26, 2021), Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD)
introduced a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution of disapproval to invalidate the
Office of the Comptroller of the Currency’s (OCC) true lender
rule. The resolution is co-sponsored by Senate Banking Committee
Chair Sherrod Brown (D-OH) and Senators Jack Reed (D-RI), Elizabeth
Warren (D-MA), Catherine Cortez-Masto (NV), Tina Smith (D-MN), and
Dianne Feinstein (D-CA). Rep. Chuy Garcia (D-IL) participated in
the introduction of the resolution, signaling support for the
resolution by House Democrats. The Biden Administration has not yet
stated its support for the resolution, though President Biden is
likely to sign the resolution into law if Congress passes it.

With the statutory deadline for Congress to take up the
resolution of disapproval quickly approaching in approximately
mid-May, Congress will have to either pass the resolution when it
returns in April from its two week recess, or effectively defer to
President Biden’s future Comptroller of the Currency to
determine the future of the rule. Given the Democrats’ narrow
majorities in both houses of Congress, the vote on the resolution
is expected to be close with possible defections on both sides of
the aisle. If Congress does not pass the resolution by the
statutory deadline, the new Comptroller of the Currency could still
seek to repeal or modify the rule at a later date. President Biden
has not yet announced a nominee for Comptroller.

If Congress passes the resolution of disapproval and President
Biden signs it into law, it would effectively restore the various
pre-rule, court-created standards for determining the true lender
under certain bank partner programs involving national banks and
federal savings banks. It would also create uncertainty about the
OCC’s legal authority to issue a new rule in the future on when
a national bank or federal savings association is the lender of a
loan.

Background

Last October, the OCC issued the true lender rule to clarify the
legal framework around bank lending partnerships in which a
national bank or federal savings association originates loans under
a bank partner program. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
(FDIC) did not issue a similar rule addressing when a
state-chartered bank under a bank partner program would be
considered the “true lender” and these programs continue
to operate under the varying court-created standards discussed
below. Specifically, the OCC sought to provide a clear rule on when
the bank or the third party would be considered to be the lender in
such a transaction. The true lender rule provided that a national
bank or federal savings association would be considered the lender
if, “as of the date of origination: [the bank] (1) is named as
the lender in the loan agreement, or (2) funds the loan.” In
providing this clear legal standard, the OCC sought to facilitate
lending by national banks and federal savings associations
(including by making it easier for banks to free up their balance
sheets for new lending) and to enhance their risk management
(including by making it easier to remove longer-term assets from
their balance sheets and shrink their asset-liability mismatch). To
address concerns about national banks or federal savings
associations entering into “rent-a-charter” schemes to
allow nonbanks to avoid state consumer protection laws (especially
state usury laws), the OCC specifically stated in its release that
“[t]hese arrangements have absolutely no place in the federal
banking system” and warned the “[i]f a bank fails to
satisfy its compliance obligations, the OCC will not hesitate to
use its enforcement authority.”

The true lender rule has been sharply criticized by consumer
protection advocates on grounds that it undercuts state consumer
protection laws by promoting rent-a-charter arrangements involving
short-term, high-interest loans. In his public statement
introducing the resolution of disapproval, Chair Brown argued that
the true lender rule “eviscerated state consumer protection
laws” by allowing unregulated nationwide payday lending. He
further stated that “federal regulators needed to crackdown on
abusive ‘rent-a-bank’ schemes.” Several states,
including New York and California, have filed suit against the OCC seeking to invalidate the
rule on grounds that the agency exceeded its authority in issuing
the rule and violated the Administrative Procedures Act (APA).

The Congressional Review Act

Under the CRA, Congress can pass a resolution of disapproval to
invalidate major rules by federal agencies using expedited
procedures, which, most importantly, do not permit the resolution
to be filibustered in the Senate. However, the resolution of
disapproval must still be signed into law by the President, so the
CRA has only been used when one party has a majority in both houses
of Congress and holds the presidency. Under President George W.
Bush, one CRA resolution of disapproval was enacted. Under
President Donald Trump, 16 CRA resolutions of disapproval were
enacted. No Democratic President has signed a CRA resolution of
disapproval.

The CRA also imposes strict time limits for Congress to adopt a
resolution of disapproval using its fast-track procedures. In
particular, the Senate has 60 session days (days in which the
Senate meets) to pass the resolution of disapproval using
fast-track procedures (which do not permit the use of the
filibuster). The 60-session days start on the later of the date
that (1) Congress receives a report on the rule that the CRA
requires agencies to provide before a rule can take effect, or (2)
the rule is published in the Federal Register. However, if an
agency submits the report on the rule to Congress and Congress
adjourns before the expiration of 60 session days in the Senate or
60 legislative days in the House, then the CRA provides for a
“look-back period,” which restarts the CRA time limits
from the beginning of the next session. In such case, the Senate
has 60 session days starting on the 15th session day of the next
session to adopt the resolution of disapproval using CRA’s
expedited procedures. Applying the lookback time limits to the
117th Congress, Congress has until approximately mid-May
(depending on if Congress has unexpected adjournments) to use the
CRA on rules issued after August 21, 2020, which is the beginning
of the look-back period. The true lender rule falls in the lookback
period because it was published in the Federal Register on October
30, 2020, and the House and Senate received the OCC’s report on
the rule on November 5th and 10th,
respectively. In contrast, the OCC’s and the FDIC’s
valid-when-made (a.k.a. the Madden-fixes) rules were
submitted to the Federal Register and their reports were provided
to Congress before August 21, 2020, and, therefore, fall outside of
the lookback period and cannot be invalided by Congress using the
CRA.

Consequences of Invalidation

Any rule invalidated under the CRA is treated as if the rule had
never taken effect. Accordingly, if the true lender rule is
invalidated under the CRA, the law governing when a national bank
or federal savings association is acting as the “true
lender” would revert back to its status prior to the issuance
of the rule. Under the prior standard, courts have issued divergent
standards for determining whether a bank was the lender under a
bank partner program. Some courts looked to whether the bank’s
name was on the loan documents. Other courts have reviewed the
totality of the circumstances or the performance of certain
ministerial functions related to the program, while others have
evaluated the economic interests of the parties in the loans being
originated under the program. Banks seeking to originate loans
through lending platforms or other service providers, and potential
investors in loans originated under such relationships, had been
left to struggle with uncertainty not only as to which party
ultimately would be determined to be the true lender, but also as
to the basic standards under which the relationship would be
judged. Resolving this predicament and bringing clarity to the
secondary market were the principle reasons that the OCC had issued
the true lender rule.

In addition, a successful CRA invalidation of the true lender
rule could substantially impact the OCC’s authority to address
the true lender issue in the future because the CRA prohibits an
agency from reissuing any rule previously invalided under the CRA
in “substantially the same form.” The courts have yet to
rule on the scope of the “substantially the same form”
prohibition, but they almost certainly would prohibit the OCC from
re-issuing the true lender in its current form or with mere
cosmetic changes.

The Biden Administration and Congressional Democrats have so far
refrained from using the CRA to remove Trump-era regulations likely
due, in part, to concerns that agencies that issue new rules to
replace the invalidated rules would face legal challenges on
grounds that they violated the “substantially the same
form” standard. From a practical perspective, the CRA provides
a faster way to repeal a rule than having an agency go through APA
notice-and-comment procedures, which often take months and can take
more than a year. But if the goal is to repeal and replace a rule
(as is likely the case for the Biden Administration and
Congressional Democrats with respect to many Trump-era rules)
rather than just repealing a rule, the “substantially the same
form” standard does create a potential hurdle to replacing a
rule.

In the case of the true lender rule, however, congressional
opponents of the rule may be seeking to use the CRA precisely
because it would make it difficult for a future Comptroller to
issue a new rule on when a bank is the true lender. As noted above,
the state attorneys’ general opposing the rule argue in their
suit that the OCC does not have the authority to promulgate the
rule. Thus, opponents of the rule may have tactically decided that
using the CRA (rather than having a new Comptroller repeal the rule
through APA notice-and-comment procedures) would place another
obstacle in front of a subsequent rulemaking on the true lender
issue by another administration. In the future, even if the OCC did
issue a new true lender with modifications that the Comptroller
considered to be substantial changes, the agency could still face
legal challenges as parties opposed to the rule could seek to
litigate the “substantially the same form” standard as a
means of delaying the implementation of the rule. Such a delay
could be long enough for a new Comptroller to assume office or a
change in control of Congress to occur, which could then allow for
the withdrawal of the new rule or its invalidation under the
CRA.

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‘I Don’t Like Owing Anybody Money’: Why Latino Students Avoid College Loans https://ronbercume.com/i-dont-like-owing-anybody-money-why-latino-students-avoid-college-loans/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 10:32:27 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/?p=312 Lee esta historia en español. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, Andres Mendoza leaves work an hour early so he can get home in time for his online classes. When he gets home, he lets his wiener dog Draco outside, then logs onto Blackboard to get his latest assignments. “It’s only technically nine questions, but it’s really […]]]>

Lee esta historia en español.

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, Andres Mendoza leaves work an hour early so he can get home in time for his online classes.

When he gets home, he lets his wiener dog Draco outside, then logs onto Blackboard to get his latest assignments.

“It’s only technically nine questions, but it’s really probably about 40 questions,” Mendoza said, looking over his accounting assignment on a recent Tuesday afternoon. “This actually doesn’t look too bad. I might not be doing homework all night today. Okay, this isn’t that bad. That’s a relief.”

Mendoza is 25 and a junior at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He works full time and goes to college part time so he can support himself without going into debt.

Like many Latino college students in San Antonio, Mendoza is wary of student loans.

“I’ve never liked to owe anybody money, regardless if it’s $5.50. I don’t like owing anybody money, so having to owe the government money is even worse,” he said.

San Antonio’s Black and Latino college students are significantly more likely to avoid taking out student loans because they’re afraid they won’t be able to pay them back.

In a survey Texas Public Radio sent to students currently or recently enrolled in one of San Antonio’s public institutions of higher education, Hispanic students were just as likely as white students to take out loans. But the reasons they didn’t take out loans varied depending on their race and ethnicity.

A little more than half of the Black and Latino survey respondents said they didn’t take out loans because they were afraid they wouldn’t be able to pay them back. However, only 34% of white respondents expressed the same fear. That’s compared to 72% of white students who said they could get by without loans.

According to college finance expert Sandy Baum with the Urban Institute, avoiding student loans when you have a hard time paying for college without it can reduce a student’s chances of graduating.

“Even though the public discourse is very much about how borrowing too much can be a problem, there is some pretty strong evidence that not borrowing enough can also be a problem,” Baum said. “The issue is pretty straightforward: if you take a loan instead of working the extra hours to get that money, then you have more time to devote to your studies.”

Mendoza originally planned to go to Texas State University after high school, but he didn’t receive enough financial aid. Like a lot of middle income families, his parents made too much money for him to qualify for the Pell Grant, but not enough to be able to afford tuition, room and board without loans.

“I mean, they could have paid for it, but my circumstances were a little bit difficult. My senior year, my grandpa had actually passed away on like, the first day of my senior year. And then, unexpectedly, my uncle — who was supposed to take care of everybody over there, he passed away from pancreatic cancer,” Mendoza said. “My parents being the good people that they are, forked over a lot of money to help with the funeral expenses, so I didn’t want to throw another big lump sum of money at them.”

Instead, Mendoza opted to stay in Corpus Christi and go to the local community college, Del Mar.

“My parents were happy to pay for me to go to community college, because it was significantly cheaper,” Mendoza said. “We made it out with no debt or anything like that, and it was a blessing in disguise, honestly.”

Now that he’s older, Mendoza is eligible for some need-based financial aid because he files independently from his parents, but it doesn’t cover everything. He charges the occasional textbook to a credit card, and works full time to cover his living expenses without taking out student loans.

Other Debt Burdens

Camille Phillips

Andres Mendoza does school work on his laptop.

Mendoza is one of several Hispanic survey respondents interviewed by TPR who has other kinds of debt even though he avoids student loans. He has car payments; another student has business loans.

Erica McDonald is working to pay off credit card debt.

“I wish that was something that they (would) teach us like in high school, about APR and credit cards and things like that, because I probably would never have taken out a credit card when I was 18,” said McDonald. “My mom just told us never to take out loans.”

McDonald is 30 and married with two young children. She stays home with her kids and takes online classes at San Antonio College while her husband works.

“People send me stuff for student loans, (but) I don’t want to do that,” McDonald said. “I would worry about it, and since I’m not working, having to ask my husband, ‘Hey, can you help me pay the student loan?’ No, it would just bother me. So that’s why I tried really, really hard to make sure that I had really good grades to qualify for financial aid.”

She decided to go back to college last fall, 10 years after she dropped out.

“This is the first year that I’ve even really been driven to really go to school, like I was like, ‘Alright, let’s do it.’ And I did it during the most stressful time of America, when everyone was adjusting to the pandemic,” McDonald said. “I wanted to be able to have a purpose (beyond staying home with the kids).”

McDonald wants to open a vegetarian food truck, but she felt like she needed to know more about running a business first.

Her first semester back, she hadn’t been approved for financial aid yet. She enrolled in two classes while she waited for her Pell grant to kick in.

“That’s all I could afford at the time. I would have taken more if I had had the money to spend,” McDonald said. “My husband put things on credit cards, just so I could go to school. He really did a lot just so to make sure I could start school.”

They added the $800 tuition fee to the credit card balance they’re trying to pay off, even though it has a high interest rate. McDonald said they hope to be able to pay it off when they get their tax returns.

“Hopefully we’ll be able to just pay that one off, because that’s the one that hurts us the most,” she said.

Her experience with credit card debt makes her more determined to avoid student loans.

That’s a common reaction for Black and Latino students, according to Vanessa Sansone. She’s an assistant professor of education policy at the University of Texas at San Antonio who researches inequities in access to college.

“It goes back to understanding how to navigate higher education,” said Sansone, who grew up in a lower income family on San Antonio’s East Side. “Usually loans in the context of our community are focused on like a payday lender, these predatory loans.”

“It’s pretty traumatic when you have somebody who’s trying to repossess your car because you couldn’t pay your note,” Sansone said. “Even though one could say, ‘But a student loan is a good investment and you can always pay that back once you get your job,’ (Black and Brown students) have this context of what a loan is, and how it has consistently harmed their families and their communities. The way that they’re making decisions about things is going to be completely different than a white student.”

“Data consistently shows that Black and Brown communities have been targeted for predatory loans in all different industries,” Sansone said.

Lower-income Latinos that responded to TPR’s survey were less likely to take out student loans than white students in the same income brackets.

Less than 40% of Latino respondents with a family income of less than $35,000 took out student loans, compared to almost 60% of white students with less than $35,000. Black respondents with lower family incomes were also less likely to take out loans.

Income

San Antonio’s Black and Latino college students are also significantly more likely to be from low-income families, giving them fewer resources to fall back on during tough times.

More than half of the Black and Latino survey respondents had a family income of less than $50,000, compared to less than one-third of white respondents.

San Antonio College student Francisco Hernandez said that’s part of the reason he’s avoided student loans.

“Growing up in a low-income family I have seen my family all suffer debt,” Hernandez said. “They had to work multiple jobs just to be able to pay off one loan when they had multiple other loans taken out in their name.”

Hernandez is 22 and finishing his final semester at the community college. He wants to work for a river authority or some other organization involved in water resources after he finishes his bachelor’s degree.

After seeing his family struggle with loans, he said he would be constantly worried if he took out student loans. He grew up in Brownsville and moved to San Antonio when he was 18.

“After college, I want my time to be my time,” Hernandez said. “(I don’t want to have to) stress my mind and my body to work more than one job just to be able to pay (them) back.”

He works full time at a call center while going to school full time. He also takes on odd jobs whenever he can, doing manual labor and teaching coding and piano.

The Pell grant completely covers his tuition plus some living expenses at San Antonio College, but he’s trying to save up money so that he doesn’t have to work during his first semester at Texas State University. He has enough grants and scholarships to pay for tuition at Texas State, but he’ll need to work or use his savings to cover his living expenses without taking out loans.

“I already looked at the syllabus for my classes, and just reading into them, it gets me excited for my major. But they don’t look like my typical ‘do the assignment and you’ll pass’ type of class. It definitely looks like I’ll have to do the work for it,” Hernandez said.

Immigration Status

Some Latino students also don’t have access to federally subsidized loans, which have greater protection for borrowers than other student loans. Undocumented students, including DACA recipients, aren’t eligible for federal financial aid of any type, including Pell grants and loans.

Xochitl Bynum was born in Monterrey, Mexico and moved to San Antonio when she was 11. She tried to go to college in 2007, but had to drop out because she couldn’t get any financial aid.

“I was not able to complete my studies, because I didn’t have any legal status here,” Bynum said. “I was not able to have any scholarships, I was not able to enroll in an actual university at the time, because I didn’t have a social security number.”

She became a U.S. citizen after she married, and earned two associate’s degrees in four years. Now 33 and a single mom, Bynum is studying to become an English as a Second Language teacher at Texas A&M University-San Antonio.

According to the U.S. Census, less than 15% of San Antonio’s population are foreign born. About 12% of TPR’s survey respondents were immigrants; and 90% of Latino respondents were born in the U.S.

National Research on Latino Debt Aversion

A recent national survey of students who dropped out of college also found that Latinos are wary of student loans. The 2020 report produced by the University of North Carolina and the civil rights organization Unidos US asked survey respondents if they avoided loans and if they left college in part because they didn’t want to take on more debt.

They found that Latino students were more likely than non-Latino students to avoid debt, and that avoiding student loans was part of the reason they left college without earning a degree. However, the biggest barriers for Latino students were transportation and the cost of college.

“Higher education in this nation isn’t really working for Latino students,” said Amanda Martinez of Unidos US. “There’s definitely a gap of knowledge, a gap of understanding of the community, of their needs and what makes them successful.”

The report authors said that to truly improve equity, policies at the federal and state level need to change to make college more affordable and financial aid more accessible.

According to Sandy Baum of the Urban Institute, the research is clear: students are more likely to graduate when their parents pay for college or they have enough grants to cover all of their expenses.

“The evidence about loans is more complicated, because if the loans are replacing grants, you’re better off having grants,” Baum said. “However, there is evidence that having the loans and having that cash can help you to succeed. And it’s really being short of cash that is the biggest problem and interfering with a student’s ability to succeed academically.”

Even though the UNC / Unidos US researchers found that part of the reason Latinos dropped out of college was because they didn’t want to take on more debt, report co-author Kate Sablosky Elengold said the solution isn’t to simply encourage Hispanic students to take on more debt.

“There are rational, logical reasons for Latino students, or really any student, to be averse to education debt. College is really expensive. There are predatory institutions, there are predatory lenders,” said Sablosky Elengold, an assistant professor of law at UNC. “Just asking students to take on more debt and to take more of the risk and burden onto themselves is not going to level the playing field.”

Sablosky Elengold and one of her co-authors, Jess Dorrance, said employment discrimination and inequities in the labor market are also a contributing factor. Black and Latino Americans have a higher unemployment rate than white Americans.

Dorrance said Latino students might feel like a loan is too risky because they’re not confident they’ll find a good job after they graduate.

042721_CMP_Andres_Mendoza2.jpg

Camille Phillips

Andres Mendoza is a junior at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He works full time and attends college part time.

UTSA student Andres Mendoza feels that way. He changed his major because he was worried he’d have a hard time working his way up the career ladder as a person of color.

When he started community college, he wanted to become a sports broadcaster and work for ESPN, but he noticed there were very few Latinos in primetime spots. Now he’s studying business and dreams of working for the front office of a professional sports team.

“People that are in charge of hiring at big corporations and whatnot … most of the people are white,” Mendoza said. “Since we’re people of color, we have to get a college degree and we have to go above and beyond to make an impact, to get a job somewhere, to do anything.”

He sees the cost of college as just one more barrier he has to get passed in order to succeed.

“To me loans are just not fair. I think that college should be funded for everybody, especially if they expect us to go and especially if the whole bar is set that you have to have a college degree to be successful,” Mendoza said. “Why do they expect us to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for this to happen?”

This is the second in a series of stories based on TPR’s survey on college access. Each story explores characteristics of the college experience for San Antonio’s Black and Latino students. The survey was made possible through a fellowship with the Education Writers Association and was administered by the Public Policy Research Institute at Texas A&M University-College Station.

Editor’s note: TPR consulted STATS Sense About Science, USA Director Rebecca Goldin to determine the best way to measure the statistical significance of survey findings. Due to the multiple questions included in the survey, no conclusions about the general student population were made in TPR’s reporting unless the p value was less than .0005. The survey instrument, anonymous survey response data and other statistical information is available for independent analysis here.

TPR was founded by and is supported by our community. If you value our commitment to the highest standards of responsible journalism and are able to do so, please consider making yourgift of support today.


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Regents Can’t Risk Losing Federal Funds – Dakota Free Press https://ronbercume.com/regents-cant-risk-losing-federal-funds-dakota-free-press/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/regents-cant-risk-losing-federal-funds-dakota-free-press/ Measure 26 has been launched: Even though the doctor says marijuana is good for what ails you, the Board of Regents won’t let you eat your therapeutic brownies on campus in South Dakota: south dakota public universities will not allow medical marijuana use on campus or at university, state sponsored events Board of Regents decided […]]]>

Measure 26 has been launched: Even though the doctor says marijuana is good for what ails you, the Board of Regents won’t let you eat your therapeutic brownies on campus in South Dakota:

south dakota public universities will not allow medical marijuana use on campus or at university, state sponsored events Board of Regents decided on Wednesday.

The reason: Marijuana remains illegal under federal law, and universities would potentially lose federal funds.

Regents legal adviser Nathan Lukkes said universities would violate the drug-free schools law and the drug-free workplaces law.

“From a black point of view and all in the letter of the law, that is what it is,” he said. [Bob Mercer, “S.D. Universities Will Stay Marijuana-Free, Regardless of Medical Marijuana Program,” KELO-TV, 2021.06.23].

Holders of a medical marijuana card can still take their cannabis prescriptions at home, but they better not be crazy when they arrive on campus:

When reporting for work, employees should not be weakened or unable to perform their duties. Likewise, students who attend classes or participate in activities should not be weakened or disrupt university or on-campus activities due to their off-campus medical marijuana use. Employees and students who violate these restrictions are subject to disciplinary action, policy says [South Dakota Board of Regents, press release, 2021.06.23].

The Regents are leaving out medical marijuana users. The BOR Policy Reviews Include the addition of medical cannabis cardholder status to conditions that may qualify a student for a waiver of the requirement that students live on campus for their first two years.


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Drivers no longer need licenses, drug tests, working trucks… – Dakota Free Press https://ronbercume.com/drivers-no-longer-need-licenses-drug-tests-working-trucks-dakota-free-press/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/drivers-no-longer-need-licenses-drug-tests-working-trucks-dakota-free-press/ Kristi Noem interrupted her presidential campaign to govern for a bit on Saturday. But it’s interesting that she used it to engage in a bizarre assertion of state authority over federal law. Executive Decree 2021-10 says South Dakota faces “extremely low stocks and shortages of gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and ethyl alcohol.” Strange – every […]]]>

Kristi Noem interrupted her presidential campaign to govern for a bit on Saturday. But it’s interesting that she used it to engage in a bizarre assertion of state authority over federal law.

Executive Decree 2021-10 says South Dakota faces “extremely low stocks and shortages of gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and ethyl alcohol.” Strange – every gas station I’ve stopped at in the past few days has allowed me to refuel for the regular price, but I haven’t driven West River lately, where Noem says the shortage is the more important. Jet fuel stocks are at or above the five-year average, but delivery systems are struggling to come back from the depths of the pandemic to cope with the resumption of demand. To remedy this perverse supply chain, Governor Noem declared a state of emergency and declared that truckers transporting petroleum products in South Dakota are not subject to the federal motor carrier safety regulations codified in 49 CFR Parts 390 to 399. Oil truckers must still have licenses and insurance and follow rules about height, weight and drug / alcohol use, but, according to the press release summary from Noem, the drivers do not have to respect the limits of their hours of service.

I’d like to know from my legally astute readers if a state can declare an emergency and throw federal laws and regulations out the window. But assuming Governor Noem has such emergency authority, his order appears to be way beyond the driving time limits:

  1. §390.6 prohibits trucking bosses from coercing drivers into breaking motor carrier rules and provides a complaints process for drivers who feel coerced.
  2. §390.36 prohibits carriers from harassing their drivers.
  3. §390.39 exempts covered farm vehicles from commercial driver’s license rules and requirements for the consumption and testing of controlled substances and alcohol that EO 2021-10 does not suspend. By suspending this rule, OE 2021-10 subjects farm truck drivers to more federal regulations. So put down the beer, Farmer Joe….
  4. §390.201 requires motor carriers to register with the federal government and display their US Department of Transportation numbers on their vehicles.
  5. §391.11 drivers must be at least 21 years old, have a working knowledge of English and hold a valid CDL.
  6. §391.15 disqualifies drivers from operating large rigs if they lose their CDL, drive with a blood alcohol level of 0.04 or more, refuse a drug test, transport or possess or use a controlled substance of Annex I, leave the scene of an accident or commit a crime with their trucks.
  7. §392.6 prohibits carriers from scheduling trips that would force drivers to exceed the speed limit.
  8. §392.7 requires every commercial motor vehicle to be equipped with brakes, steering, lights, tires, horn, wipers, mirrors, hitches and emergency equipment functional.
  9. §392.63 says you can’t tow a bus with passengers on board.
  10. §392.64 forbidden to transport people in locked trailers (human trafficking, anyone?).
  11. §392.71 forbids fuzzbusters.
  12. §392.80 prohibits texting while driving a semi.
  13. §392.82 prohibits the use of cell phones while driving a semi-trailer.

I’m not even a third of the federal rules Noem has just suspended, and already we can see that, at least until August 16, Noem has overturned all kinds of safety rules which, far from hampering the delivery of fuel, ensure gasoline and diesel reach their destinations safely with everyone on the highway. Her efforts to make it seem like she’s taking “quick action” shows that she hasn’t actually taken the time to read the rules and come up with a narrowly focused solution to the problem she claims to exist.


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No money or gas to escape Ida: “We cannot afford to leave” | Voice of America https://ronbercume.com/no-money-or-gas-to-escape-ida-we-cannot-afford-to-leave-voice-of-america/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/no-money-or-gas-to-escape-ida-we-cannot-afford-to-leave-voice-of-america/ Robert Owens was defeated and felt helpless on Sunday as he waited to land in the Louisiana capital as one of the strongest hurricanes to ever hit the United States. The 27-year-old has had anxious days as Hurricane Ida approached, seeing a long line of cars evacuating from Baton Rouge heading to a safer location […]]]>

Robert Owens was defeated and felt helpless on Sunday as he waited to land in the Louisiana capital as one of the strongest hurricanes to ever hit the United States.

The 27-year-old has had anxious days as Hurricane Ida approached, seeing a long line of cars evacuating from Baton Rouge heading to a safer location outside the state. He wanted him and his wife, his mother-in-law, his roommates and four pets to be among them. But leaving would have required money to buy gasoline and hotel rooms, which they did not have.

Desperate, Owens went to ACE Cash Express on Saturday to submit his payday loan documents. He was rejected and said he did not have a sufficient credit history.

On Sunday, it was clear that they would survive the storm at home in his family’s double apartment.

“Our bank account is empty, we cannot afford to leave,” he said.

Owens said most of the people in his low-income neighborhoods are in the same situation. They want to leave to protect their families, but they have no choice but to stay.

“A lot of us in my neighborhood just have to look around and wait, not knowing how bad it will be. It’s a scary feeling,” he said.

“People with reliable money can get out of here, but there are a lot of low-income people who don’t have savings accounts,” he continued. “We are being left behind.”

At 9 p.m. Sunday night, Owens said his family and everyone else in his neighborhood had lost power. He said the transformer blew up the surroundings and the sky was glowing green. Several trees collapsed on my neighbor’s property, but it was too dark to see the full extent of the damage. Owens said he was trying to use a flashlight to explore the streets, but was concerned about threatening safety.

“I have never encountered anything this big in my life,” he said, with a huge gust slamming the windows of his house.

He said there were several times it looked like the roof of the duplex might come off. He said his wife was packing essential clothes and bags just in case.

“If I lose my house, I will evacuate to the car,” he said. The whole family shares their wife Toyota Avalon. It is a vehicle that is “not big enough” to protect four, three dogs and a cat.

Earlier today, Owens quickly put a towel under the leaky window in his duplex and said he was charging his electronics. He tried to go to Dollar General and Dollar Tree to get food, but they were closed. Her family sticks lights around the walls of the house. They planned to hide in the laundry room or kitchen when the storm hit – a place without windows.

“There is a general fear of not knowing what the consequences of this will be,” he said. “This is the biggest concern. For example, what are we going to do if it really gets worse? Are we still alive? Will the tree fall on us? ? ”

Owens said his stepmother had a disability. His two roommates work for Apple iOS technical support. His wife is considering donating blood. They all depend on the Internet to work from home, and without the Internet they cannot make any money.

“We may not have a job, and the rent, electricity, water and all those bills still have to be paid,” he said. “We don’t have money for the other bills, so we’re a little worried about losing our utilities and even our house – if it’s still standing -“.

He said it was hard to feel so vulnerable because his family was being left behind.

“The fact that we’re not above the middle class is like coming back and biting us over and over again in so many different directions and ways. Simple advance payment on salary. Is one of them, ”he said. “It is as if we are trying not to be poor, but we have to pay for what is poor.”

No money or gas to escape Ida: “We cannot afford to leave” | Voice of America

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8th Circuit ruling reveals importance of nuance in state data incident law https://ronbercume.com/8th-circuit-ruling-reveals-importance-of-nuance-in-state-data-incident-law/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/8th-circuit-ruling-reveals-importance-of-nuance-in-state-data-incident-law/ Data privacy litigators are well aware of the critical importance of a motion to dismiss if unsubstantiated data incident claims are to be dismissed at the oral argument stage. A recent decision underlines the crucial importance of choice of law arguments as part of an overall litigation strategy. Why? Well, in some cases, the differences […]]]>

Data privacy litigators are well aware of the critical importance of a motion to dismiss if unsubstantiated data incident claims are to be dismissed at the oral argument stage. A recent decision underlines the crucial importance of choice of law arguments as part of an overall litigation strategy. Why? Well, in some cases, the differences between the laws of two states regarding frequently contested data incident claims can be determinative for the purposes of a motion to dismiss. Read on to find out more.

First of all, a little background. It is well established that federal courts sitting in diversity apply the conflict of law rules of the forum state. For example, in Greenstate Credit Union v. Hy-Vee, Inc., a dispute over a recently pending data incident in Minnesota federal district court, the court noted that:

Under Minnesota law, the first question is whether there is an actual conflict of laws. Next, the court must determine “whether the law of the two states can be applied constitutionally”. If there is a determinative outcome conflict and two-state law can be applied constitutionally, the court applies the Minnesota multi-factor test. . . to determine which state law should apply.

2021 US Dist. LEXIS 133894 (D. Minn. July 19, 2021).

Many data incident disputes involve tort actions (for example, negligence) which have some similarities between jurisdictions. As such, the reaction of some newbies to data privacy may be to dismiss choice of law considerations in a dispute. After all, everyone knows that a negligence claim always involves the application of the same four elements (duty, breach, causation, damage), right?

Wrong answer. Choice of law arguments can be decisive as to which party prevails in a dispute. Therefore, make an informed assessment of the laws of which forum can and should Applying in a data breach dispute is a critical investigation at the start of a case.

For example, Greenstate Credit Union The relevant class action lawsuit arose out of Hy-Vee’s handling of a data breach that exposed consumers’ credit card data. The Applicant GreenState Federal Credit Union is a federally chartered credit union headquartered in Iowa. Defendant Hy-Vee is incorporated in Iowa and has its principal place of business in Iowa. However, Hy-Vee operates supermarkets, convenience stores, and gas stations, with 240 retail stores in eight states, including Minnesota.

Why is this important? Plaintiff made claims under the Minnesota Plastic Card Security Act (PCSA), common law negligence, negligence in itself, and for declaratory and injunctive judgments. The defendant argued, however, that instead of Minnesota law, Iowa law should govern the plaintiff’s claims. This was motivated by the fact that unlike Minnesota, Iowa adopted the doctrine of economic loss. As the Iowa Supreme Court put it, this doctrine “prohibits recovery in cases of negligence where the plaintiff has suffered only economic loss”.

Here, the court found that:

GreenState’s negligence claim would be excluded by Iowa’s Economic Loss Doctrine. GreenState’s alleged injuries – cancellation of compromised cards, reissue of new cards, reimbursement to members for fraudulent charges and loss of interest and transaction fees due to reduced card use – are all indirect economic losses . . Because GreenState alleges nothing more than economic losses, Iowa law prohibits its negligence claims.

(emphasis added).

Further, based on the election rules of Minnesota law, the court concluded that “[a]All employees concerned with Hy-Vee’s information security and decision-making are located in Iowa. It is foreseeable that Iowa law would apply. For these and other reasons, the court ruled that the Iowa law should apply. He then quickly dismissed the plaintiff’s claims pursuant to a straightforward application of the Iowa Damages Act.

While the Economic Loss Rule is one of the more well-known variations of state law, there are other areas involving even more nuance. Which in turn makes choice of law considerations (and the assessment of whether a defendant should strategically advocate for the law of another forum in which a dispute has been filed to apply) absolutely essential.

© Copyright 2021 Squire Patton Boggs (US) LLPRevue nationale de droit, volume XI, number 203


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Contribution of IT managers must be part of risk management plan, says Wells Fargo executive https://ronbercume.com/contribution-of-it-managers-must-be-part-of-risk-management-plan-says-wells-fargo-executive/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/contribution-of-it-managers-must-be-part-of-risk-management-plan-says-wells-fargo-executive/ Increased security risks can prevent businesses from investing in emerging technologies, but staying on outdated systems can put businesses at greater risk. Mandy Norton, Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Risk Officer of Wells Fargo, said at the Lesbians Who Tech & Allies Debug 2020 summit on Wednesday.. Managing that balance hinges on a holistic […]]]>

Increased security risks can prevent businesses from investing in emerging technologies, but staying on outdated systems can put businesses at greater risk. Mandy Norton, Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Risk Officer of Wells Fargo, said at the Lesbians Who Tech & Allies Debug 2020 summit on Wednesday..

Managing that balance hinges on a holistic view of risk management that includes IT leadership in the conversation, Norton said.

To create the integrated view necessary to protect the business, IT leadership must translate the technology language and risk to the broader executive audience, Norton said.

“It’s really, really important to think of our risk management holistically because you can’t think of managing credit risk, fraud risk, or market risk without incorporating technology,” Norton said. “We are essentially a large technology company providing financial services. “

When Apple Pay was launched, the financial services industry suffered from a lack of holistic management, Norton said. Despite Apple Pay’s security benefits, users could expose credit card information to malicious actors when they transfer credit card information to Apple Wallet, according to Norton. The lack of end-to-end management and process communication created risks.

This is part of the reason why cybersecurity management keeps Norton from sleeping at night. Comprehensive risk management at Wells Fargo doesn’t mean the bank can keep every partner safe. Actors can target financial management applications to which Wells Fargo customers have handed their credentials, ultimately providing an avenue of attack.

“There can be gaps and that’s why you absolutely need to think about your end-to-end process,” Norton said. “Back to this holistic risk management: think about every step of the way. “

However, the benefits of innovation outweigh the risks, Norton said.

“We have great firewalls, but the ‘bad guys’ keep developing their technology as well, so you always try to keep up to date with all the ways that scammers can contact us. ” she said.

Innovate to reduce risks

A spark to innovate ignited during the COVID-19 pandemic. Customers flocked to digital services when they could no longer do in-person banking transactions, and Wells Fargo has relied on innovative technology investments to continue providing support, Norton said.

Cloud computing underpins the way businesses do business today, but there is little regulatory guidance on how to protect businesses and customers from threats in the cloud, Norton said. However, not taking that risk would put Wells Fargo behind.

A company-wide system failure last year showed Wells Fargo the importance of modernization and innovation. TThe bank had to rely on data center backups to ensure business continuity when smoke detection led to automatic shutdown of the power supply in February 2019. Customers could not access online bank accounts, and this increased the urgency to invest in modernized business solutions.

Beyond these services, Wells Fargo sees innovation as a necessary means of protecting company and customer data.

“If we don’t innovate, we won’t be able to protect ourselves and fight against the threats and risks that exist,” Norton said.

Emerging technologies also have the power to improve cyber posture by monitoring the threat landscape. Artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms can look for fraudulent activity for early detection and mitigation, Norton said.

If Wells Fargo has not updated to the latest technology and all other space companies have doneWells would become the weakest link in the chain and an attack target, Norton said. “It’s really about who has the strongest strategy, and if you don’t continuously innovate and improve… you will be the one who will be hit the hardest,” she said.


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White House: “Many” to Receive $ 1,400 Checks This Month https://ronbercume.com/white-house-many-to-receive-1400-checks-this-month/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/white-house-many-to-receive-1400-checks-this-month/ The White House said Monday that many Americans eligible for $ 1,400 stimulus checks will receive them by the end of the month, as President BidenJoe Biden Rittenhouse says Biden defamed his character by linking him to white supremacists Man accused of threatening Congress sentenced to 19 months in prison 91 House Dems call on […]]]>

The White House said Monday that many Americans eligible for $ 1,400 stimulus checks will receive them by the end of the month, as President BidenJoe Biden Rittenhouse says Biden defamed his character by linking him to white supremacists Man accused of threatening Congress sentenced to 19 months in prison 91 House Dems call on Senate to expand immigration protections in draft Biden PLUS spending lawThe coronavirus relief measure is approaching passage.

“The Treasury Department is working on what that looks like and what the treatment looks like,” the White House press secretary said. Jen psakiJen PsakiPsaki: 99% of WH officials vaccinated against COVID-19 Biden intends to run for election in 2024, Psaki says, CNN is broadcasting live footage of his reports on censorship of tennis star in China MORE said Monday. “We expect a lot of Americans to receive relief by the end of the month, but mechanically the Treasury just has to get by.”

Psaki’s remarks come as the House prepares to vote on Biden’s $ 1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package after it was passed through the Senate over the weekend. The package includes $ 1,400 in direct payment funding for Americans earning up to $ 75,000, heads of households earning up to $ 112,500, and married couples earning up to $ 150,000 together.

This will be the third round of stimulus payments sent to most Americans, following payments of $ 1,200 and $ 600 approved by Congress last year.

When asked if there were concerns about the possibility of a backlog given that some out-of-pocket payments were delayed last year, Psaki said the Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise Yellen Biden appoints Powell as Fed chairman and Brainard as vice chairman Schumer-McConnell cuts debt ceiling drama House adopts giant social policy and climate measure MORE is “laser focused” to ensure that there is a process to ensure help arrives as quickly as possible.

Biden said over the weekend that direct payments are expected to start going out this month.

“This plan will send checks, starting this month, to the American people who desperately need help, many of whom are lying in their beds at night, staring at the ceiling, wondering, ‘Am I going to lose my job, if I haven’t already done so? Will I lose my insurance? Am I going to lose my house? ‘ Biden said on Saturday following the passage of the bill by the Senate.

The House will consider the bill on Tuesday and is expected to pass it, meaning it could be ready for Biden’s signing as early as the same day.

Psaki’s remarks on Monday indicated that the Treasury would provide more guidance on the distribution of the checks.


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Austin City Council members unaware of possible transfer of bills https://ronbercume.com/austin-city-council-members-unaware-of-possible-transfer-of-bills/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://ronbercume.com/austin-city-council-members-unaware-of-possible-transfer-of-bills/ Getty Images If Austin is a potential destination for the Buffalo Bills, it’s news for the powers that be in Austin. Ryan Autullo from Austin American-Stateman spoke with several members of Austin City Council. And they said that sunday report of ESPN’s Seth Wickersham as a potential destination for invoices is the first they heard […]]]>

Getty Images

If Austin is a potential destination for the Buffalo Bills, it’s news for the powers that be in Austin.

Ryan Autullo from Austin American-Stateman spoke with several members of Austin City Council. And they said that sunday report of ESPN’s Seth Wickersham as a potential destination for invoices is the first they heard about it.

That would mean that the Bills’ potential move to Austin is, at least for now, a leverage to get public funding in Buffalo.

That doesn’t mean it can’t become something more than that. But, obviously, if team owners Terry and Kim Pegula are to get the attention of politicians in Erie County and New York City, they have to have a Plan B. The fact that Plan B is not yet viable doesn’t doesn’t matter.

It is not a surprise. In any negotiation, leverage is necessary. If the Bills have no alternative to Buffalo, they have no real leverage.

So for now, that seems to be part of the effort to maximize public money for a new stadium in Buffalo. The Pégulas would have proposed that the place will be fully funded by taxpayers’ money. This is certainly not the case; to get (for example) 50 percent of the project paid for by public money, they have to start higher than that. Asking 100 percent is, of course, as high as it gets.

The larger reality is that the cat is now out of the bag. So whether it’s Austin or wherever, any other city that covets an NFL franchise now knows that the Bills could be on the line. These cities have to ask themselves if they’re ready to be a pawn in a game that they can’t. not win, or if they can actually put together a package that can grab the attention of the Pegulas.

It remains to be seen where he goes from here. However, the time has come for people in western New York State to reflect on the possibility of the emergence of a “or whatever” destination. And if another city does what Buffalo, Erie County and / or New York City won’t, tough decisions may need to be made.

It’s unfortunate, but it’s a fundamental fact of NFL business. The Rams, Chargers and Raiders relocations prove that owners will go where the money is, or where a privately funded stadium is more likely to generate consistent profits. And if the money is not in Buffalo, the possibility that the money is elsewhere becomes extremely relevant. So what might start out as a bluff might turn into something more than that.

Is this how it should be? No, but that’s how it is. Until the Pegulas put together an acceptable plan for a new stadium in Buffalo, the possibility that another team can find a way to defeat the Bills will be on the table. Time will tell if it’s Austin or somewhere else. To get the best deal in Buffalo, a place other than Buffalo has to become a viable alternative. Until a new deal is struck in Buffalo, there is a possibility that a location other than Buffalo could become the new home of a team that, ideally, would never move.

Here we are, hoping that does not happen. But it happened in St. Louis, San Diego, Oakland, Cleveland and Baltimore. This could indeed happen in Buffalo. It shouldn’t, but it could. The longer it takes for public funding to be secured in Buffalo, the more likely it is that another American city will decide that its ticket to legitimacy comes from attracting an NFL team to town.



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